Part 3-research

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Daido Moriyama has a self-proclaimed addiction to cities. At age 73, his work still shares the same inclination to record his surroundings as his earliest pictures, taken during the dramatic transformation of 1960s post-war Japan. Moriyama used his camera to document the American military occupation of his country and the dissolution of traditional values experienced alongside accelerated modernization. In a process he maintains today, Moriyama shot with a small hand-held automatic camera, rarely with attention to the viewfinder (firing his shutter as if by machine gun.) In his depictions of city life, Moriyama documents cultural change and chaotic urban experience, typically in grainy, black-and-white, high-contrast images, which he prints himself. Early influences include photographers Eikoh Hosoe, Eugène Atget, Weegee, and William Klein, all who shared a similar affection for the dynamics of city life.

Daido Moriyama is one of my favourite photographer. look his photography, looks very normal and doesn't let me feel very "good' in photography area, because of he doesn't really care about the composition, he don't really think a good photo should have the decisive moment, his work  is very rough and very high contact, the angle is very shock, different than all photographer, he use out of the ordinary to show his work which is amazing. 

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For almost seventy years Yayoi Kusama has developed a practice, which, though it shares affiliations with Surrealism, Minimalism, Pop art, Eccentric Abstraction, the Zero and Nul movements, resists any singular classification. Born in Matsumoto City, Japan in 1929, she studied painting in Kyoto before moving to New York in the late 1950s, and by the mid-1960s had become well known in the avant-garde world for her provocative happenings and exhibitions. Since this time, Kusama's extraordinary artistic endeavours have spanned painting, drawing, collage, sculpture, performance, film, printmaking, installation and environmental art as well as literature, fashion (most notably in her 2012 collaboration with Louis Vuitton) and product design.

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Before launching her brand in London in 2005, Uma Wang studied fashion design at Central Saint Martin’s in London and worked as an in-house designer for a number of Chinese labels. Wang’s designs often mix-and-match different fabrics and textures, with hand-knitted dresses and cardigans among her signature pieces. She has been named one of Vogue Italia’s up-and-coming designers to watch, and her collections have been shown in London, Paris, and Milan. Wang’s designs are stocked in boutiques across Europe, as well as Shanghai.

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The Artist Is Present reveals a lot about the most famous living performance artist—but says little about her art

There’s some serious artiness going on over at MoMA. Artist Marina Abramović has a new performance called “The Artist is Present” that involves her sitting silently across from museum visitors. The show runs from March 14 to May 31 and, with the exception of a few days, Abramović sits from before the museum opens and continuously through when the museum closes. MoMa also provides a live stream of her performing.

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Most people participating sit in front of Abramović for anywhere from a few minutes to an hour. One woman sat there for a whopping six and a half hours.

There’s also a good number of people with teary eyes, whether from the stress of sitting and staring, or from being moved emotionally somehow through the performance

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"To create this “Death self,” the two performers devised a piece in which they connected their mouths and took in each other’s exhaled breaths until they had used up all of the available oxygen. Seventeen minutes after the beginning of the performance they both fell to the floor unconscious, their lungs having filled with carbon dioxide. This personal piece explored the idea of an individual’s ability to absorb the life of another person, exchanging and destroying it".

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Milton Glaser (born June 26, 1929) is an American graphic designer. His designs include the I ❤ NY logo, the psychedelic Bob Dylan poster, and the Brooklyn Brewery logo. In 1954, he also co-founded Push Pin Studios, founded New York Magazine with Clay Felker, and established Milton Glaser, Inc. in 1974. His artwork has been featured in exhibits, and placed in permanent collections in many museums worldwide Throughout his long career, he has designed many posters, publications and architectural designs. He has received many awards for his work, including the National Medal of the Arts award from President Barack Obama in 2009, and was the first graphic designer to receive this award

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Bob Dylan Poster

In 1966, Glaser designed a poster for Bob Dylan’s “Greatest Hits” LP. It was one of Glaser’s first posters. The poster depicts the profile of Bob’s face with psychedelic, swirly hair, with “Dylan” written at the bottom in one of Glaser’s typefaces. His inspiration for the poster was Marcel Duchamp’s 1957 Self-Portrait; and Art Nouveau, “That was an influence for the colors and shapes in the picture.” 6 million posters have been printed and distributed, and sells for hundreds of dollars, and has become a huge collectable.

 

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Push Pin Studios

After graduating at the Cooper Union in New York City, Reynold Ruffins, Seymour Chwast, Edward Sorel and Glaser, founded Push Pin Studios in 1954. Glaser joined after his return in Italy. In 1957, the "Push Pin Monthly Graphic," was sent out to friends and clients. They rejected tradition and favored “reinvigorated interpretations of historical styles.” The studio “redefined and expanded the imprimatur of the designer, illustrator, and visual culture at large.”

 

Push Pin Studios is a graphic design and illustration studio formed in New York City in 1954. Cooper Union graduates Milton Glaser, Seymour Chwast, Reynold Ruffins, and Edward Sorel founded the studio.

After graduating from Cooper Union, Sorel and Chwast worked for a short time at Esquire magazine, both being fired on the same day. Joining forces to form an art studio, they called it "Push Pin" after a mailing piece, The Push Pin Almanack, which they self-published during their time at Esquire. Sorel and Chwast used their unemployment checks to rent a cold-water flat on East 17th Street in Manhattan. A few months later, Glaser returned from a Fulbright Fellowship year in Italy and joined the studio.

The bi-monthly publication The Push Pin Graphic was a product of their collaboration. A distinctive quality of Push Pin's early illustration work was a "bulgy" three-dimensional line.

Sorel left Push Pin in 1956, the same day the studio moved into a much nicer space on East 57th Street.[1] For twenty years Glaser and Chwast directed Push Pin, while it became a guiding reference in the world of graphic design. Today, Chwast is principal of The Pushpin Group, Inc.

The exhibition "The Push Pin Style" traveled to the Museum of Decorative Arts of the Louvre, as well as numerous cities in Europe, Brazil, and Japan in 1970–72.

Graphic designers and illustrators John Alcorn (in the late 1950s), Paul Davis (1959-1963), Barry Zaid (1969–1975), Paul Degen (1970s) and others spent time at Push Pin early in their careers.

 

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Brooklyn Brewery

 

Steve Hindy and Tom Potter, the originators of Brooklyn Beer, came looking for an identity 28 years ago. They had the name Brooklyn Eagle, which Milton suggested was not as good a name for a beer as the word ‘Brooklyn’, itself. Brooklyn became the name and identity and the company has had an extraordinary sales history since then. It has also encouraged the borough of Brooklyn to become the most active artisanal beer producing area in the entire country. The studio has done all advertising, promotional material and packaging since then.

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In 1968, Clay Felker and I founded New York Magazine, where I was president and design director until 1977. The publication became the model for city magazines, and stimulated a host of imitations. 

 

 
 
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RenHang, he is my favourite Chinese Photographer /poet, his work mostly is shooting more than 2 people, the style of photography is close to photographer Nan Goldin, the different between Renhang and Nan is Nan's work more like documentary photography, means without posting and styling, just shoot people's they didn't know, but Renhang's work more like photographer Jeff Wall, everything is set up before shoot, I like Renhang's work because he dared to challenge, he is not afraid of to social public opinion and people's negative comments, just do the art, because he's work mostly naked, in China, relatively feudal society, most people can not accept it, pornography always had negative comments in China, but Renhang doesn't care about anything, just make art, this is the reason why I adore, If you care so much things when you make art, than you can can not create anything 

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24 Feb, photographer and poet choose to end his life in age 29.

that's shocking me few days, I cant believe that true, but I know the reason, I think everyone knows why he suicide, he always published something about don't want to live, finally maybe to dead is the easy way for Renhang, because he had depression .

my work was inspired by his depression. 

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